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About Antoine de Saint-Exupéry



Antoine Marie Jean-Baptiste Roger (1900 – 1944) , simply known as de Saint-Exupéry, was a French writer, poet, aristocrat, journalist and pioneering aviator. He became a laureate of several of France’s highest literary awards and also won the United States National Book Award. Wikipedia

References:  Encyclopaedia Britannica  |  Biography.com

  

Quotes by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry (quotes)

  • To live is to be slowly born.
  • I still fall for your everyday.
  • Man is, above all, he who creates.
  • One must observe the proper rites.
  • I saw the sunset forty-four times!
  • On ne sait jamais! One never knows!
  • It’s useful because it’s beautiful.
  • A goal without a pan is just a wish.
  • One only really sees with the heart.
  • You’re not a man, you’re a mushroom!
  • Pure logic is the ruin of the spirit.
  • No one is ever satisfied where he is.
  • Straight ahead you can’t go very far.
  • Grown ups are certainly very strange.
  • He who never says “no” is no true man.
  • Where I live, everything is very small.
  • I am who I am and I have the need to be.
  • I was too young to know how to love her.
  • The one thing that matters is the effort.
  • He who would travel happy must travel lite.
  • It’s hard luck always having to be a judge.
  • Language is the source of misunderstandings.
  • You risk tears if you let yourself be tamed.
  • To be a man is, precisely, to be responsible.
  • Night, when words fade and things come alive.
  • It is such a secret place, the land of tears.
  • He who must travel happily must travel light.
  • Make your life a dream, and a dream a reality.
  • Life always bursts the boundaries of formulas.
  • When someone blushes, doesn’t that mean ‘yes’?
  • I shall never again admire a merely brave man.
  • Attitude is a paintbrush. It colors everything!
  • Man is a knot into which relationships are tied.
  • Trying to be witty leads to lying, more or less.
  • You give birth to that on which you fix your mind
  • The only things you learn are the things you tame
  • Once you are my friend, I am responsible for you.
  • You see, one loves the sunset when one is so sad.
  • Only the children know what they are looking for.
  • Even our misfortunes are a part of our belongings.
  • There is no hope of joy except in human relations.
  • You know… when you are sad you love the sunsets.
  • Truths may clash without contradicting each other.
  • For, to conceited men, all other men are admirers.
  • Truth, for any man, is that which makes him a man.
  • Nothing can match the treasure of common memories.
  • It is only with the heart that one can see rightly.
  • But eyes are blind. You have to look with the heart.
  • Real love begins where nothing is expected in return.
  • True love begins when nothing is looked for in return.
  • When you give yourself, you receive more than you give.
  • Of what worth are convictions that bring not suffering?
  • We are forever responsible for that which we have tamed.
  • Loneliness is bred of a mind that has grown earth-bound.
  • It is not for us to forecast the future, but to shape it.
  • You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed.
  • If Someone wants a sheep, then that means that he exists.
  • No individual is isolated. He who is sad, saddens others.
  • When a mystery is too overpowering, one dare not disobey.
  • To forget a friend is sad. Not everyone has had a friend.
  • The thing that is important is the thing that is not seen.
  • Flying is a man’s job and its worries are a man’s worries.
  • I know but one freedom and that is the freedom of the mind.
  • I am very fond of sunsets. Come, let us go look at a sunset.
  • The airplane has unveiled for us the true face of the earth.
  • The tree is a slow, enduring force straining to win the sky.
  • War is not an adventure. It is a disease. It is like typhus.
  • There is no growth except in the fulfillment of obligations.
  • I was wrong to grow older.   I was so happy as a child.
  • A sky as pure as water bathed the stars and brought them out.
  • You become responsible for a long time for what you’ve tamed.
  • Cries of despair, misery, sobbing grief are a kind of wealth.
  • Each man carries within him the soul of a poet who died young.
  • Sorrow is one of the vibrations that prove the fact of living.
  • The time for action is now. It’s never too late to do something.
  • It is much more difficult to judge oneself than to judge others.
  • A man’s age represents a fine cargo of experiences and memories.
  • He fell as gently as a tree falls. There was not even any sound.
  • Ephemeral” It means ‘which is in danger of speedy disappearance.
  • You’re beautiful, but you’re empty…. No one could die for you.
  • When you tame someone they become unique to you in all the world
  • Let your dream devour your life, not your life devour your dream.
  • True love is inexhaustible; the more you give, the more you have.
  • What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.
  • An administration, like a machine, does not create. It carries on.
  • I fly because it releases my mind from the tyranny of petty things.
  • Tell me who admires and loves you, and I will tell you who you are.
  • I have always learned to distinguish the important from the urgent.
  • If you tame me, it would be as if the sun came to shine on my life.
  • As for the future, your task is not to foresee it, but to enable it.
  • One runs the risk of weeping a little, if one lets himself be tamed.
  • What value has compassion that does not take its object in its arms?
  • It is the duty of the ship’s captain to make port, cost what it may.
  • Man is but a network of relationships and these alone matter to him.
  • All grown-ups were once children… but only few of them remember it.
  • A single event can awaken within us a stranger totally unknown to us.
  • In order to cure a feeling of malaise, you have to throw light on it.
  • Truth is not that which is demonstrable but that which is ineluctable.
  • In giving you are throwing a bridge across the chasm of your solitude.
  • It is as a soldier that you make love and as a lover that you make war.
  • There is nothing that can equal the treasure of so many shared memories.
  • Perfection is not when there is no more to add, but no more to take away.
  • Horror causes men to clench their fists, and in horror men join together.
  • More wisdom is latent in things as they are than in all the words men use.
  • The field of consciousness is tiny. It accepts only one problem at a time.
  • The essential things in life are seen, not with the eyes but with the heart.
  • The soldier’s body becomes a stock of accessories that are not his property.
  • Man’s progress is but a gradual discovery that his questions have no meaning.
  • Sometimes, there is no harm in putting off a piece of work until another day.
  • Love, like a carefully loaded ship, crosses the gulf between the generations.
  • When one wishes to play the wit, he sometimes wander a little from the truth.
  • It is the time you have wasted for your rose that makes your rose so important.
  • How could drops of water know themselves to be a river? Yet the river flows on.
  • True love is visible not to the eyes but to the heart, for eyes may be deceived.
  • But certainly, for us who understand life, figures are a matter of indifference.
  • If you want to build a ship, teach the men to yearn for the vast and endless sea.
  • When faith burns itself out, ’tis God who dies and thenceforth proves unavailing.
  • Defeat may prove to have been the only path to resurrection, despite its ugliness.
  • Life has meaning only if one barters it day by day for something other than itself.
  • It’s all a great mystery…Look up at the sky and you’ll see how everything changes
  • Defeat is a thing of weariness, of incoherence, of boredom, and above all futility.
  • It is always in the midst, in the epicenter, of your troubles that you find serenity.
  • Sometimes we behave as though there was something more important than life. But what?
  • Whoever loves above all the approach of love will never know the joy of attaining it.
  • It is the savor of bread broken with comrades that makes us accept the values of war.
  • True happiness comes from the joy of deeds well done, the zest of creating things new.
  • To love is not to look at one another: it is to look, together, in the same direction.
  • Perfection is attained, not when no more can be added, but when no more can be removed.
  • One’s suffering disappears when one lets oneself go, when one yields – even to sadness.
  • A child is not frightened at the thought of being patiently transmuted into an old man.
  • Let a man in a garret but burn with enough intensity and he will set fire to the world.
  • To become a man is to be responsible; to be ashamed of miseries that you did not cause.
  • Action and personal happiness have no truck with each other; they are eternally at war.
  • But the conceited man did not hear him. Conceited people never hear anything but praise.
  • C’est v√©ritablement utile puisque c’est joli. It is truly useful since it is beautiful.
  • And at night I love to listen to the stars. It is like five hundred million little bells.
  • He had taken seriously words which were without importance, and it made him very unhappy.
  • The meaning of things lies not in the things themselves, but in our attitude towards them.
  • Experience will guide us to the rules. You cannot make rules precede practical experience.
  • I believe that for his escape he took advantage of the migration of a flock of wild birds.
  • I remembered the fox. One runs the risk of crying a bit if one allows oneself to be tamed.
  • A civilization is built on what is required of men, not on that which is provided for them.
  • We don‚Äôt ask to be eternal beings. We only ask that things do not lose all their meaning.
  • Perfection is reachednot when there’s nothing to add, but when there’s nothing to take away.
  • Once men are caught up in an event, they cease to be afraid. Only the unknown frightens men.
  • To be a man is to feel that one’s own stone contributes to building the edifice of the world.
  • The wind in the grain is the caress to the spouse; it is the hand of peace stroking her hair.
  • Friendship is born from an identity of spiritual goals – from common navigation toward a star.
  • Of course, I love you,’ the flower said to him. ‘If you were not aware of it, it was my fault.
  • What does tamed mean? It’s something that’s been too often neglected. It means to create ties.
  • Prison is not a mere physical horror. It is using a pickaxe to no purpose that makes a prison.
  • One is a member of a country, a profession, a civilization, a religion. One is not just a man.
  • In every crowd are certain persons who seem just like the rest, yet they bear amazing messages.
  • Living is being born slowly. It would be a little too easy if we could borrow ready-made souls.
  • The house, the stars, the desert — what gives them their beauty is something that is invisible!
  • I did not know how to reach him, how to catch up with him… The land of tears is so mysterious.
  • You cannot plant an acorn in the morning, and expect that afternoon to sit in the shade of an oak.
  • Love does not cause suffering: what causes it is the sense of ownership, which is love’s opposite.
  • My drawing was not a picture of a hat. It was a picture of a boa constrictor digesting an elephant.
  • Perhaps creativity is fumbling that dance step, or driving the chisel the wrong way into the stone.
  • What sets men at variance is but the treachery of language, for always they desire the same things.
  • It is in your act that you exist, not in your body. Your act is yourself, and there is no other you.
  • The dignity of the individual demands that he be not reduced to vassalage by the largesse of others.
  • Only the unknown frightens men. But once a man has faced the unknown, that terror becomes the known.
  • Love does not consist in gazing at each other, but in looking outward together in the same direction.
  • It’s quite simple: One sees clearly only with the heart. Anything essential is invisible to the eyes.
  • Every person that comes into our life comes for a reason; some come to learn and others come to teach.
  • Freedom and constraint are two aspects of the same necessity, which is to be what one is and no other.
  • But if you come at just any time, I shall never know at what hour my heart is to be ready to greet you.
  • We are prudent people. We are afraid to let go of our petty reality in order to grasp at a great shadow.
  • It was the contemplation of God that created men who were equal, for it was in God that they were equal.
  • The machine does not isolate man from the great problems of nature but plunges him more deeply into them.
  • A chief is a man who assumes responsibility. He says ‘I was beaten,’ he does not say ‘My men were beaten.’
  • Well, I must endure the presence of a few caterpillars if I wish to become acquainted with the butterflies.
  • What saves a man is to take a step. Then another step. It is always the same step, but you have to take it.
  • I am beginning to understand,” said the little prince. “There is a flower… I think that she has tamed me.
  • If I had fifty-three minutes to spend as I liked, I should walk at my leisure toward a spring of fresh water.
  • You will have five hundred million little bells, and I shall have five hundred million springs of fresh water.
  • The arms of love encompass you with your present, your past, your future, the arms of love gather you together.
  • That’s the way they are. You must not hold it against them. Children should be very understanding of grown-ups.
  • What do we mean by setting a man free? You cannot free a man who dwells in a desert and is an unfeeling brute.
  • A man has many parts, he is virtually everything, and you are free to select in him that part which pleases you.
  • Here is my secret. It is very simple: one sees well only with the heart. The essential is invisible to the eyes.
  • If France is to be judged, judge her not by the effects of her defeat but by her readiness to sacrifice herself.
  • The flower you single out is a rejection of all other flowers; nevertheless, only on these terms is it beautiful.
  • He who has gone, so we but cherish his memory, abides with us, more potent, nay, more present than the living man.
  • Mad is the man who is forever gritting his teeth against that granite block, complete and changeless, of the past.
  • One day, I watched the sun setting forty-four times……You know…when one is so terribly sad, one loves sunsets.
  • One must require from each one the duty which each one can perform. Accepted authority rests first of all on reason.
  • Look at the sky. Ask yourselves: Has the sheep eaten the flower, yes or no? And you will see how everything changes.
  • No single event can awaken within us a stranger whose existence we had never suspected. To live is to be slowly born.
  • One can be a brother only in something. Where there is no tie that binds men, men are not united but merely lined up.
  • If it is true that wars are won by believers, it is also true that peace treaties are sometimes signed by businessmen.
  • I wonder,” he said, “whether the stars are set alight in heaven so that one day each one of us may find his own again.
  • Each man must look to himself to teach him the meaning of life. It is not something discovered: it is something molded.
  • What he had yearned to embrace was not the flesh but a down spirit, a spark, the impalpable angel that inhabits the flesh.
  • A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.
  • We live not by things, but by the meaning of things. It is needful to transmit the passwords from generation to generation.
  • If you love a flower that lives on a star, it is sweet to look at the sky at night. All the stars are a-bloom with flowers.
  • Si quelqu’un veut un mouton, c’est la preuve qu’il en existe un. (If somebody wants a sheep, that is a proof that one exists.)
  • A designer knows he has achieved perfection not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
  • But games always cover something deep and intense, else there would be no excitement in them, no pleasure, no power to stir us.
  • “What place would you advise me to visit now?” he asked. “The planet Earth,” replied the geographer. “It has a good reputation.”
  • For there is but one problem – the problem of human relations. We forget that there is no hope or joy except in human relations.
  • You know you’ve achieved perfection in design, not when you have nothing more to add, but when you have nothing more to take away.
  • Although human life is priceless, we always act as if something had an even greater price than life… but what is that something?
  • If a composer suffers from loss of sleep and his sleeplessness induces him to turn out masterpieces, what a profitable loss it is!
  • What torments me is not the humps nor hollows nor the ugliness. It is the sight, a little bit in all these men, of Mozart murdered.
  • Behind all seen things lies something vaster; everything is but a path, a portal or a window opening on something other than iteself.
  • I shall look at you out of the corner of my eye, and you will say nothing. Words are the source of misunderstandings.” -from the Fox-
  • And that heart which was a wild garden was given to him who only loved trim lawns. And the imbecile carried the princess into slavery.
  • “Men have forgotten this truth,” said the fox. “But you must not forget it. You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed.”
  • Intelligence is not creative; judgment is not creative. If a sculptor is nothing but skill and mind, his hands will be without genius.
  • And the little prince broke into a lovely peal of laughter, which irritated me very much. I like my misfortunes to be taken seriously.
  • You do not explain the tree by telling of the water it has drunk, the minerals it has absorbed, and the sunlight that strengthened it.
  • How is it possible for one to own the stars?” “To whom do they belong?” the businessman retorted, peevishly. “I don’t know. To nobody.
  • Grown-ups never understand anything for themselves, and it is tiresome for children to be always and forever explaining things to them.
  • It is the missed opportunity that counts, and in a love that vainly yearns from behind prison bars you have perchance the love supreme.
  • The notion of looking on at life has always been hateful to me. What am I if I am not a participant? In order to be, I must participate.
  • We must not subject him who creates to the desires of the multitude. It is, rather, his creation that must become the multitude’s desire.
  • The tender friendships one gives up, on parting, leave their bite on the heart, but also a curious feeling of a treasure somewhere buried.
  • I have lived a great deal among grown-ups. I have seen them intimately, close at hand. And that hasn‚Äôt much improved my opinion of them.
  • But if you tame me, then we shall need each other. To me, you will be unique in all the world. To you, I shall be unique in all the world.
  • Peace is present when things form part of a whole greater than their sum, as the diverse minerals in the ground collect to become the tree.
  • Even though human life may be the most precious thing on earth, we always behave as if there were something of higher value than human life.
  • The important thing is to strive toward a goal which is not immediately visible. That goal is not the concern of the mind, but of the spirit.
  • No truth is proved, no truth achieved, by argument, and the ready-made truths men offer you are mere conveniences or drugs to make you sleep.
  • Demagoguery enters at the moment when, for want of a common denominator, the principle of equality degenerates into the principle of identity.
  • And now here is my secret, a very simple secret; it is only with the heart that one can see rightly, what is essential is invisible to the eye.
  • You know…my flower…I’m responsible for her. And she’s so weak! And so naive. She has four ridiculous thorns to defend her against the world.
  • If I were to command a general to turn into a seagull, and if the general did not obey, that would not be the general’s fault. It would be mine.
  • If you are to be, you must begin by assuming responsibility. You alone are responsible for every moment of your life, for every one of your acts.
  • True, it is evil that a single man should crush the herd, but see not there the worse form of slavery, which is when the herd crushes out the man.
  • What sets us against one another is not our aims – they all come to the same thing – but our methods, which are the fruit of our varied reasoning.
  • What have you come to Earth for?’ ‘I’m having difficulties with a flower,’ the little prince said. ‘Ah!’ said the snake. And they were both silent.
  • Good taste” is a virtue of the keepers of museums. If you scorn bad taste, you will have neither painting nor dancing, neither palaces nor gardens.
  • He who bears in his heart a cathedral to be built is already victorious. He who seeks to become sexton of a finished cathedral is already defeated.
  • I have always loved the desert. One sits down on a desert sand dune, sees nothing, hears nothing. Yet through the silence something throbs, and gleams.
  • The tree is more than first a seed, then a stem, then a living trunk, and then dead timber. The tree is a slow, enduring force straining to win the sky.
  • “It’s a question of discipline,” the little prince told me later on. “When you’ve finished washing and dressing each morning, you must tend your planet.”
  • Vain is the hope of finding pleasure in that which one has hitherto disdained; as when the warrior hopes to find pleasure in the joys of the sedentaries.
  • If someone loves a flower, of which just one single blossom grows, in all the millions of stars, it is enough to make him happy just to look at the stars.
  • Charity never humiliated him who profited from it, nor ever bound him by the chains of gratitude, since it was not to him but to God that the gift was made.
  • When one is building a ship, one does not begin with gathering timber and cutting planks, but rather by arousing in people the yearning for the great wide sea.
  • We say nothing essential about the cathedral when we speak of its stones. We say nothing essential about Man when we seek to define him by the qualities of men.
  • I don’t believe you! Flowers are weak creatures. They are naive. They reassure themselves as best they can. They believe that their thorns are terrible weapons.
  • Nothing comes of severity if there be no leanings towards a change of heart. And if there be natural leanings towards a change of heart, what need for severity?
  • A smile is often the key thing.One is paid with a smile. One is rewarded with a smile. One is brightened by a smile. And the quality of a smile can make one die.
  • We understand ‚Ķ that what constitutes the dignity of a craft is that it creates a fellowship, that it binds men together and fashions for them a common language.
  • Freedom and constraint are two aspects of the same necessity, the necessity of being the man you are and not another. You are free to be that man, but not another.
  • if a sheep eats bushes does it eat flowers too? a sheep eats whatever it finds even a flower with thorn? even a flower with thorns. then what’s the good of thorns?
  • Peace dies when the framework is ripped apart. When there is no longer a place that is yours in the world. When you know no longer where your friend is to be found.
  • Navigating by the compass in a sea of clouds over Spain is all very well, it is very dashing, but – you want to remember that below the sea of clouds lies eternity.
  • That is the hardest thing of all. It is much harder to judge yourself than to judge others. If you succeed in judging yourself, it’s because you’re truly a wise man.
  • He sat down. I sat down next to him. And after a silence, he spoke again. ‘The stars are beautiful because of a flower you don’t see…’ I answered, ‘Yes, of course.
  • I will appoint captains to rule my cities, for it is in the compelling zest of high adventure and of victory, and in creative action, that man finds his supreme joys.
  • To forget a friend is sad. Not every one has had a friend. And if I forget him, I may become like the grown‚àíups who are no longer interested in anything but figures.
  • How could there be any question of acquiring or possessing, when the one thing needful for a man is to become – to be at last, and to die in the fullness of his being.
  • One man may hit the mark, another blunder; but heed not these distinctions. Only from the alliance of the one, working with and through the other, are great things born.
  • If you want to build a ship, don’t drum up people to collect wood and don’t assign them tasks and work, but rather teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea.
  • The seed haunted by the sun never fails to find its way between the stones in the ground. And the pure logician, if no sun draws him forth, remains entangled in his logic.
  • You’ll be bothered from time to time by storms, fog, snow. When you are, think of those who went through it before you, and say to yourself, ‘What they could do, I can do.’
  • If you want to build a ship, don’t summon people to buy wood, prepare tools, distribute jobs, and organize the work; teach people the yearning for the wide, boundless ocean.
  • For true love is inexhaustible; the more you give, the more you have. And if you go to draw at the true fountainhead, the more water you draw, the more abundant is its flow.
  • No single event can awaken within us a stranger totally unknown to us. To live is to be slowly born. It would be a bit too easy if we could go about borrowing ready-made souls.
  • Only the children know what they are looking for. They waste their time over a rag doll and it becomes very important to them; and if anybody takes it away from them, they cry.
  • The proof that the little prince existed is that he was charming, that he laughed, and that he was looking for a sheep. If anybody wants a sheep, that is a proof that he exists.
  • Perfection is finally attained not when there is no longer anything to add, but when there is no longer anything to take away, when a body has been stripped down to its nakedness.
  • We do not pray for immortality, but only not to see our acts and all things stripped suddenly of all their meaning; for then it is the utter emptiness of everything reveals itself.
  • My life is very monotonous,” the fox said. “I hunt chickens; men hunt me. All the chickens are just alike, and all the men are just alike. And, in consequence, I am a little bored.
  • When you want to build a ship, then do not drum the men together in order to procure wood, to give instructions or to distribute the work, but teach them longing for the wide endless sea.
  • If you want to build a boat, do not instruct the men to saw wood, stitch the sails, prepare the tools and organize the work, but make them long for setting sail and travel to distant lands.
  • No destiny attacks us from outside. But, within him, man bears his fate and there comes a moment when he knows himself vulnerable; and then, as in a vertigo, blunder upon blunder lures him.
  • What was my body to me? A kind of flunkey in my service. Let but my anger wax hot, my love grow exalted, my hatred collect in me, and that boasted solidarity between me and my body was gone.
  • When I find a woman attractive, I have nothing at all to say. I simply watch her smile. Intellectuals take apart her face in order to explain it bit by bit, but they no longer see the smile.
  • You are beautiful, but you are empty,‚Äù he went on. ‚ÄúOne could not die for you. To be sure, an ordinary passerby would think that my rose looked just like you–the rose that belongs to me.
  • The field of consciousness is tiny. It accepts only one problem at a time. Get into a fist fight, put your mind on the strategy of the fight, and you will not feel the other fellow’s punches.
  • No one has tamed you and you haven’t tamed anyone.Your’e the way my fox was. He was just a fox like a hundred thousand others. But I’ve made him my friend, and now he’s the only fox in the world.
  • It is not a question of living dangerously. That formula is too arrogant, too presumptuous. I don’t care much for bull-fighters. It’s not the danger I love. I know what I love. It is life itself.
  • Transport of the mails, transport of the human voice, transport of flickering pictures-in this century as in others our highest accomplishments still have the single aim of bringing men together.
  • How desperately difficult it is to be honest with oneself. It is much easier to be honest with other people.What is true is invisible to the eye. It is only with the heart that one can see clearly.
  • One cannot build life from refrigerators, politics, credit statements and crossword puzzles. That is impossible. Nor can one exist for any length of time without poetry, without color, without love.
  • I have no right, by anything I do or say, to demean a human being in his own eyes. What matters is not what I think of him; it is what he thinks of himself. To undermine a man’s self-respect is a sin.
  • Treason implies responsibility for something, control over something, influence upon something, knowledge of something. Treason in our time is a proof of genius. Why, I want to know, are not traitors decorated?
  • The one thing that matters is the effort. It continues, whereas the end to be attained is but an illusion of the climber, as he fares on and on from crest to crest; and once the goal is reached it has no meaning.
  • But if you tame me, my life will be filled with sunshine. I’ll know the sound of footsteps that will be different from all the rest. Others send me back underground. Yours will call me out of my burrow like music.
  • All of us have had the experience of a sudden joy that came when nothing in the world had forewarned us of its coming – a joy so thrilling that if it was born of misery we remembered even the misery with tenderness.
  • Surely a man needs a closed place wherein he may strike root and, like the seed, become. But also he needs the great Milky Way above him and the vast sea spaces, though neither stars nor ocean serve his daily needs.
  • To grasp the meaning of the world of today we use a language created to express the world of yesterday. The life of the past seems to us nearer our true natures, but only for the reason that it is nearer our language.
  • Men have no more time to understand anything. They buy things all ready made at the shops. But there is no shop anywhere where one can buy friendship, and so men have no friends any more. If you want a friend, tame me.
  • He who is different from me does not impoverish me – he enriches me. Our unity is constituted in something higher than ourselves – in Man… For no man seeks to hear his own echo, or to find his reflection in the glass.
  • I showed the grown ups my maasterpiece, andI asked them if my drawing scared them. They answered why be scared of a hat? My drawing was not a picture of a hat. It was a picture of a boa constrictor digesting an elephant.
  • The Beauty of the Mountain is hidden for all those who try to discover it from the top, supposing that, one way or an other, one can reach this place directly. The Beauty of the Mountain reveals only to those who climbed it.
  • Water, thou hast no taste, no color, no odor; canst not be defined, art relished while ever mysterious. Not necessary to life, but rather life itself, thou fillest us with a gratification that exceeds the delight of the senses.
  • Confuse not love with the raptures of possession, which bring the cruellest of sufferings. For, notwithstanding the general opinion, love does not cause suffering: what causes it is the sense of ownership, which is love’s opposite.
  • Only he can understand what a farm is, what a country is, who shall have sacrificed part of himself to his farm or country, fought to save it, struggled to make it beautiful. Only then will the love of farm or country fill his heart.
  • At one time I say to myself: “Surely not! The little prince shuts his flower under her glass globe every night, and he watches over his sheep very carefully . . .” Then I am happy. And there is sweetness in the laughter of all the stars.
  • The meaning of things lies not in the things themselves, but in our attitude towards them in particular caused by what we compare it to: something worse and we feel grateful for what we have; something better and we feel somehow let down.
  • The magic of the craft has opened for me a world in which I shall confront, within two hours, the black dragons and the crowned crests of a coma of blue lightnings, and when night has fallen I, delivered, shall read my course in the starts.
  • Of course I’ll hurt you. Of course you’ll hurt me. Of course we will hurt each other. But this is the very condition of existence. To become spring, means accepting the risk of winter. To become presence, means accepting the risk of absence.
  • Nothing can match the treasure of common memories, of trials endured together, of quarrels and reconciliations and generous emotions. It is idle, having planted an acorn in the morning, to expect that afternoon to sit in the shade of the oak.
  • She knew this man’s smile, his gentle ways of love, but not his godlike fury in the storm. She might snare him in a fragile net of music, love and flowers, but, at each departure, he would break forth without, it seemed to her, the least regret.
  • Night, the beloved. Night, when words fade and things come alive. When the destructive analysis of day is done, and all that is truly important becomes whole and sound again. When man reassembles his fragmentary self and grows with the calm of a tree.
  • She cast her fragrance and her radiance over me. I ought never to have run away from her… I ought to have guessed all the affection that lay behind her poor little stratagems. Flowers are so inconsistent! But I was too young to know how to love her.
  • Nobody grasped you by the shoulder while there was still time. Now the clay of which you were shaped has dried and hardened, and naught in you will ever awaken the sleeping musician, the poet, the asronomer that possibly inhabited you in the beginning.
  • The friend within the man is that part of him which belongs to you and opens to you a door which never, perhaps, is opened to another. Such a friend is true, and all he says is true; and he loves you even if he hates you in other mansions of his heart.
  • I ought not to have listened to her,’ he confided to me one day. ‘One never ought to listen to the flowers. One should simply look at them and breathe their fragrance. Mine perfumed all my planet. But I did not know how to take pleasure in all her grace.
  • One day,” you said to me, “I saw the sunset forty-four times!” And a little later you added: “You know– one loves the sunset, when one is so sad…” “Were you so sad, then?” I asked, “on the day of the forty-four sunsets?” But the little prince made no reply.
  • The theoretician believes in logic and believes that he despises dreams, intuition, and poetry. He does not recognize that these three fairies have only disguised themselves in order to dazzle him…. He does not know that he owes his greatest discoveries to them.
  • A civilization is a heritage of beliefs, customs, and knowledge slowly accumulated in the course of centuries, elements difficult at times to justify by logic, but justifying themselves as paths when they lead somewhere, since they open up for man his inner distance.
  • To be a man is, precisely, to be responsible. It is to feel shame at the sight of what seems to be unmerited misery. It is to take pride in a victory won by one’s comrades. It is to feel, when setting one’s stone, that one is contributing to the building of the world.
  • The strong are strengthened by reverses; the trouble is that the true meaning of events scores next to nothing in the match we play with men. Appearances decide our gains or losses and the points are trumpery. And a mere semblance of defeat may hopelessly checkmate us.
  • When the body sinks into death, the essence of man is revealed. Man is a knot, a web, a mesh into which relationships are tied. Only those relationships matter. The body is an old crock that nobody will miss. I have never known a man to think of himself when dying. Never.
  • You – you alone will have the stars as no one else has them…In one of the stars I shall be living. In one of them I shall be laughing. And so it will be as if all the stars were laughing, when you look at the sky at night…You – only you – will have stars that can laugh.
  • Are wars… anything but the means whereby a nation’s problems are set, where creation is stimulated – there you have adventure. But there is no adventure in heads-or-tails, in betting that the toss will come out of life or death. War is not an adventure. It is a disease. It is like typhus.
  • Once we are bound together to our brothers by a common good that is outside us, then we can breathe. Experience teaches us that love is not to gaze at one another but to gaze in the same direction. There is no comradeship except through unity on the same rope, climbing towards the same peak.
  • For instance, if you come at four in the afternoon, I’ll begin to be happy by three. The closer it gets to four, the happier I’ll feel. By four I’ll be excited and worried; I’ll discover what it costs to be happy! But if you come at any od time, I’ll never know when I should prepare my heart… There must be rites.
  • The injustice of defeat lies in the fact that its most innocent victims are made to look like heartless accomplices. It is impossible to see behind defeat, the sacrifices, the austere performance of duty, the self-discipline and the vigilance that are there – those things the god of battle does not take account of.
  • A pilot’s business is with the wind, and with the stars, with night, with sand, with the sea. He strives to outwit the forces of nature. He stares with expectancy for the coming of the dawn the way a gardener awaits the coming of spring. He looks forward to port as a promised land, and truth for him is what lives in the stars.
  • Why are you drinking? demanded the little prince. “So that I may forget,” replied the tippler. “Forget what?” inquired the little prince, who was already sorry for him. “Forget that I am ashamed,” the tippler confessed, hanging his head. “Ashamed of what?” insisted the little prince, who wanted to help him. “Ashamed of drinking!
  • A man’s age is something impressive, it sums up his life: maturity reached slowly and against many obstacles, illnesses cured, griefs and despairs overcome, and unconscious risks taken; maturity formed through so many desires, hopes, regrets, forgotten things, loves. A man’s age represents a fine cargo of experience and memories.
  • In those days, I didn’t understand anything. I should have judged her according to her actions, not her words. She perfumed my planet and lit up my life. I should never have run away! I ought to have realized the tenderness underlying her silly pretensions. Flowers are so contadictory! But I was too young to know how to love her.
  • If some one loves a flower of which just one example exists among all the millions and millions of stars, that’s enough to make him happy when he looks at the stars. He tells himself, “My flower’s up there somewhere. . . .” But if the sheep eats the flower, then for him it’s as if, suddenly, all the stars went out. And that isn’t important?
  • It’s a question of discipline,’ the little prince told me later on. ‘when you’ve finished washing and dressing each morning, you must tend your planet. you must be sure you pull up the baobabs regularly, as soon as you can tell them apart from the rosebushes, which they closely resemble when they’re very young. It’s very tedious work, but very easy.
  • Life always bursts the boundaries of formulas. Defeat may prove to have been the only path to resurrection, despite its ugliness. I take it for granted that to create a tree I condemn a seed to rot. If the first act of resistance comes too late it is doomed to defeat. But it is, nevertheless, the awakening of resistance. Life may grow from it as from a seed.
  • People where you live,” the little prince said, “grow five thousand roses in one garden… yet they don’t find what they’re looking for… They don’t find it,” I answered. And yet what they’re looking for could be found in a single rose, or a little water…” Of course,” I answered. And the little prince added, “But eyes are blind. You have to look with the heart.
  • Using an artful tool does not make one a dry technician. It seems to me that people that are anxious about our technical advancement, confuse means and ends. Naturally a person that only works for material gain will not harvest something that is worth living for. But the machine is not an end in itself. The airplane is not an end. It is a tool. Just like the plough.
  • I know a planet where there is a certain red-faced gentleman. He has never smelled a flower. He has never looked at a star. He has never loved any one. He has never done anything in his life but add up figures. And all day he says over and over, just like you: ‘I am busy with matters of consequence!’ And that makes him swell up with pride. But he is not a man – he is a mushroom!
  • All men have the stars,” he answered, “but they are not the same things for different people. For some, who are travellers, the stars are guides. For others they are no more than little lights in the sky. For others, who are scholars, they are problems. For my businessman they were wealth. But all the stars are silent. You–you alone–will have the stars as no one else has them–
  • If you tame me, then we shall need each other. To me, you will be unique in all the world. To you, I shall be unique in all the world‚Ķif you tame me, it will be as if the sun came to shine on my life. I shall know the sound of a step that will be different from all the others. Other steps send me hurrying back underneath the ground. Yours will call me, like music, out of my burrow
  • There is no liberty except the liberty of some one making his way towards something. Such a man can be set free if you will teach him the meaning of thirst, and how to trace a path to a well.  Only then will he embark upon a course of action that will not be without significance.  You could not liberate a stone if there were no law of gravity – for where will the stone go, once it is quarried?
  • The first stars tremble as if shimmering in green water. Hours must pass before their glimmer hardens into the frozen glitter of diamonds. I shall have a long wait before I witness the soundless frolic of the shooting stars. In the profound darkness of certain nights I have seen the sky streaked with so many trailing sparks that it seemed to me a great gale must be blowing through the outer heavens.
  • When I opened my eyes I saw nothing but the pool of nocturnal sky, for I was lying on my back with out-stretched arms, face to face with that hatchery of stars. Only half awake, still unaware that those depths were sky, having no roof between those depths and me, no branches to screen them, no root to cling to, I was seized with vertigo and felt myself as if flung forth and plunging downward like a diver.
  • Commonly, people believe that defeat is characterized by a general bustle and a feverish rush. Bustle and rush are the signs of victory, not of defeat. Victory is a thing of action. It is a house in the act of being built. Every participant in victory sweats and puffs, carrying the stones for the building of the house. But defeat is a thing of weariness, of incoherence, of boredom. And above all of futility.
  • Grown-ups love figures… When you tell them you’ve made a new friend they never ask you any questions about essential matters. They never say to you “What does his voice sound like? What games does he love best? Does he collect butterflies? ” Instead they demand “How old is he? How much does he weigh? How much money does his father make? ” Only from these figures do they think they have learned anything about him.
  • When we think that the machine will harm man, then it is perhaps because we are not yet capable of judging the rapid changes it has brought about. We hardly feel at home in this landscape of mines and power stations. We have just moved into this new home that we have not even finished yet. Everything around us has changed so fast – personal relations, working conditions, habits. Even our state of mind is in turmoil.
  • We are all youthful barbarians, and only our new toys bring us excitement. That has been the sole purpose of our flights. This one flies higher, that one faster. But now we will make ourselves at home. We will forget the machine, the tool. It is no longer complex; it does what it is supposed to do, unnoticed. And through this tool we will find again the old nature, the nature of the gardener, the navigator, the poet.
  • My senses of space, of distance, and of direction entirely vanished. When I looked for the ground I sometimes looked down, sometimes up, sometimes left, sometimes right. I thought I was very high up when I would suddenly be thown to earth in a near vertical spin. I thought I was very low to the ground and I was pulled up to 3,000 feet in two minutes by the 500-horsepower motor. It danced, it pushed, it tossed. . . . Ah! la la!
  • For I do not want any one to read my book carelessly. I have suffered too much grief in setting down these memories. Six years have already passed since my friend went away from me, with his sheep. If I try to describe him here, it is to make sure that I shall not forget him. To forget a friend is sad. Not every one has had a friend. And if I forget him, I may become like the grown-ups who are no longer interested in anything but figures.
  • So the crew fly on with no thought that they are in motion. Like night over the sea, they are very far from the earth, from towns, from trees. The clock ticks on. The dials, the radio lamps, the various hands and needles go though their invisible alchemy. . . . and when the hour is at hand the pilot may glue his forehead to the window with perfect assurance. Out of oblivion the gold has been smelted: there it gleams in the lights of the airport.
  • What did I care about my hammer, about my bolt, about thirst or death? There was, on one star, on one planet, on mine, the Earth, a little prince to be consoled! I took him in my arms. I rocked him. I told him, ‘The flower you love is not in danger…I’ll draw you a muzzle for your sheep…I’ll draw you a fence for your flower…I’ I didn’t know what to say. How clumsy I felt! I didn’t know how to reach him, where to find him…It’s so mysterious, the land of tears.
  • So the little prince tamed the fox. And when the hour of his departure drew near– Ah,” said the fox, “I shall cry.” It is your own fault,” said the little prince. “I never wished you any sort of harm; but you wanted me to tame you . . .” Yes, that is so,” said the fox. But now you are going to cry!” said the little prince. Yes, that is so,” said the fox. Then it has done you no good at all!” It has done me good,” said the fox, “because of the color of the wheat fields.
  • I don’t understand these people anymore, that travel the commuter-trains to their dormitory towns. These people that call themselves human, but, by a pressure they do not feel, are forced to do their work like ants. With what do they fill their time when they are free of work on their silly little Sundays? I am very fortunate in my profession. I feel like a farmer, with the airstrips as my fields. Those that have once tasted this kind of fare will not forget it ever. Not so, my friends?
  • And when your sorrow is comforted (time soothes all sorrows) you will be content that you have known me. You will always be my friend. You will want to laugh with me. And you will sometimes open your window, so, for that pleasure . . . And your friends will be properly astonished to see you laughing as you look up at the sky! Then you will say to them, ‘Yes, the stars always make me laugh!’ And they will think you are crazy. It will be a very shabby trick that I shall have played on you.
  • People have stars, but they aren’t the same. For travelers, the stars are guides. For other people, they’re nothing but tiny lights. And for still others, for scholars, they’re problems… But all those stars are silent stars. You, though, you’ll have stars like nobody else… since I’ll be laughing on one of them, for you it’ll be as if all the stars are laughing. You’ll have stars that can laugh!… and it’ll be as if I had given you, instead of stars, a lot of tiny bells that know how to laugh.
  • The job has its grandeurs, yes. There is the exultation of arriving safely after a storm, the joy of gliding down out of the darkness of night or tempest toward a sun-drenched Alicante or Santiago; there is the swelling sense of returning to repossess one’s place in life, in the miraculous garden of earth, where are trees and women and, down by the harbor, friendly little bars. When he has throttled his engine and is banking into the airport, leaving the somber cloud masses behind, what pilot does not break into song?
  • On a day of burial there is no perspective–for space itself is annihilated. Your dead friend is still a fragmentary being. The day you bury him is a day of chores and crowds, of hands false or true to be shaken, of the immediate cares of mourning. The dead friend will not really die until tomorrow, when silence is round you again. Then he will show himself complete, as he was–to tear himself away, as he was, from the substantial you. Only then will you cry out because of him who is leaving and whom you cannot detain.
  • GOOD MORNING,” said the little prince. “Good Morning,” said the salesclerk. This was a salesclerk who sold pills invented to quench thirst. Swallow one a week and you no longer feel any need to drink. “Why do you sell these pills?” “They save so much time,” the salesclerk said. “Experts have calculated that you can save fifty-three minutes a week.” “And what do you do with those fifty-three minutes?” “Whatever you like.” “If I had fifty-three minutes to spend as I liked,” the little prince said to himself, “I’d walk very slowly toward a water fountain.
  • There is a cheap literature that speaks to us of the need of escape. It is true that when we travel we are in search of distance. But distance is not to be found. It melts away. And escape has never led anywhere. The moment a man finds that he must play the races, go the Arctic, or make war in order to feel himself alive, that man has begin to spin the strands that bind him to other men and to the world. But what wretched strands! A civilization that is really strong fills man to the brim, though he never stir. What are we worth when motionless, is the question.
  • I am looking for friends. What does that mean – tame?” “It is an act too often neglected,” said the fox. “It means to establish ties.” “To establish ties?” “Just that,” said the fox. “To me, you are still nothing more than a little boy who is just like a hundred thousand other little boys. And I have no need of you. And you, on your part, have no need of me. To you I am nothing more than a fox like a hundred thousand other foxes. But if you tame me, then we shall need each other. To me, you will be unique in all the world. To you, I shall be unique in all the world.
  • You’re beautiful, but you’re empty…One couldn’t die for you. Of course, an ordinary passerby would think my rose looked just like you. But my rose, all on her own, is more important than all of you together, since she’s the one I’ve watered. Since she’s the one I put under glass, since she’s the one I sheltered behind the screen. Since she’s the one for whom I killed the caterpillars (except the two or three butterflies). Since she’s the one I listened to when she complained, or when she boasted, or even sometimes when she said nothing at all. Since she’s my rose.
  • Sitting in the flickering light of the candles on this kerchief of sand, on this village square, we waited in the night. We were waiting for the rescuing dawn – or for the Moors. Something, I know not what, lent this night a savor of Christmas. We told stories, we joked, we sang songs. In the air there was that slight fever that reigns over a gaily prepared feast. And yet we were infinitely poor. Wind, sand, and stars. The austerity of Trappists. But on this badly lighted cloth, a handful of men who possessed nothing in the world but their memories were sharing invisible riches.
  • And they heard the roaring thunder of a third brilliantly lighted express. “Are they pursuing the first travelers?” demanded the little prince. “They are pursuing nothing at all,” said the switchman. “They are asleep in there, or if they are not asleep they are yawning. Only the children are flattening their noses against the windowpanes.” “Only the children know what they are looking for,” said the little prince. “They waste their time over a rag doll and it becomes very important to them; and if anybody takes it away from them, they cry…” “They are lucky,” the switchman said.
  • I’ll look as if I’m dead, and that won’t be true.’ I said nothing. ‘You understand. It’s too far. I can’t take this body with me. It’s too heavy.’ I said nothing. ‘But it’ll be like an old abandoned shell. There’s nothing sad about an old shell…’ I said nothing. ‘It’ll be nice, you know. I’ll be looking at the stars, too. All the stars will be wells with a rusty pulley. All the stars will pour out water for me to drink…’ I said nothing. ‘And it’ll be fun! You’ll have five-hundred million little bells; I’ll have five-hundred million springs of fresh water…’ And he, too, said nothing more.